Mininalism guide

Minimalism

The definition of Minimalistic taken fron the dictionary is: “Minimal and minimize come from the Latin adjective minimus, “least, smallest,” and people therefore useminimal to refer to the smallest possible amount”

Acording to Wikipedia, minimalism is when the work is stripped down to its most fundamental feature.
Many artists and amateurs have tried to define Minimalism, but since it is a philosophical topic, we still haven’t agreed at one single definition.

Minimal as less elements 

Merche Suárez Louzao says: “The art of appreciating the essential” 
She describes the art of minimalism like that: When the number of recognizable and perceivable elements in a picture is minimal

Alone in the dark

Candle

Minimal as few destinctive colors

Color helps to recognize different objects. A picture with a few objects with strong colors can be considered minimal.

Sunset trough a window

The Window

Minimal as in small objects

This is the art of seeing beauty in the small sthings. Many artists consider photography of small pictures (also known as Micro photography) as Minimalism.

Dewdrop on geraniums

Dewdrop

Minimalism as simple geometry

Pictures with few simple geometrical curves and lines can also be minimalist. They are easy to perceive.

Minimalism as parts of a whole

Sometimes an object or scene is too big and complicated. But images that focus on parts of it can be quite  minimalistic.

Rectangles and circle

Minimalism as repeating shapes

When a picture is mostly comprised of repeated objects or patterns, it can be considered minimalist too.

A sunblind

The Sunblind

Minimalism as in low detail

When a picture has less detail, it can usually be considered as minimalistic.

The Light Ring

Just A Fancy Ring

Pictures with a high level of details cannot be considered Minimalism.

And here you have an interestng aticle that kan be usefull if you decide to go on with minimalistic photography. It’s A 10 Step Guide to Superb Minimalist Photography.

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