Panoramic photography

Mountains near the village of Kalofer

Mountains near the village of Kalofer

Panoramic photography

is a technique of photography, using specialized equipment or software, that captures images with elongated fields of view. It is sometimes known aswide format photography. The term has also been applied to a photograph that is cropped to a relatively wide aspect ratio. While there is no formal division between “wide-angle” and “panoramic” photography, “wide-angle” normally refers to a type of lens, but using this lens type does not necessarily make an image a panorama. An image made with an ultra wide-angle fisheye lens covering the normal film frame of 1:1.33 is not automatically considered to be a panorama. An image showing a field of view approximating, or greater than, that of the human eye – about 160° by 75° – may be termed panoramic. This generally means it has an aspect ratio of 2:1 or larger, the image being at least twice as wide as it is high. The resulting images take the form of a wide strip. Some panoramic images have aspect ratios of 4:1 and sometimes 10:1, covering fields of view of up to 360 degrees. Both the aspect ratio and coverage of field are important factors in defining a true panoramic image.

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Mininalism guide

Minimalism

The definition of Minimalistic taken fron the dictionary is: “Minimal and minimize come from the Latin adjective minimus, “least, smallest,” and people therefore useminimal to refer to the smallest possible amount”

Acording to Wikipedia, minimalism is when the work is stripped down to its most fundamental feature.
Many artists and amateurs have tried to define Minimalism, but since it is a philosophical topic, we still haven’t agreed at one single definition.

Minimal as less elements 

Merche Suárez Louzao says: “The art of appreciating the essential” 
She describes the art of minimalism like that: When the number of recognizable and perceivable elements in a picture is minimal

Alone in the dark

Candle

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Kukeri

Here in Bulgaria we have a traditional festival that takes place every year in January. We call it Kukerovden (Kuker day). The whole thing is more like a carnival (like the one in Rio, but scarier). Men, and recently women also, dress in hand made costumes witch cover most of the body and they also include decorated wooden masks of animals (sometimes double-faced) and large bells, called chamove attached to a belt. The Kukers walk and dance through the village to scare evil spirits away with the costumes and the sound of the bells, as well as to provide a good harvest, health, and happiness to the village during the year. All the people from the village gather to see that show, and to drink some home made red wine.

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